Author Archives: Richard T. Seymour

About Richard T. Seymour

I have been practicing law in the fields of employment law, civil rights, class actions, appeals, and ADR since I left the government in 1969. One of the benefits of a long practice is that one learns a lot along the way. I use this as an advocate, arbitrator, mediator, and advisor.

Do You Have a “For Cause” Employment Contract?

Employees usually have the most rights under an employment contract that either says the employee will be employed for a specific period of time, or says the employer is restricting its ability to fire the employee to specific circumstances, such as “for cause,” with a definition of the term. Employers trying to recruit high-level managers, or persons with hard-to-find skills, find “for cause” agreements a powerful tool in persuading the desired prospects to leave what they were doing and sign up with the employer.

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Posted in "At-Will" Employment, DC Employment Agreements, Employment Contracts in DC, Employment Law Newsletters, Unfair Treatment On the Job, Washington DC Employment Contracts | Tagged , | Comments Off on Do You Have a “For Cause” Employment Contract?

What Does It Mean to Be an “At Will” Employee?

“At will” is a legal phrase that means the employer has the right to fire an employee at any time, for any reason, including a senseless, mean, spiteful, or arbitrary reason, as long as the reason is not unlawful. An “at will” employment can be ended at the will of either the employer or the employee. An employment contract that has no definite duration, and that has no limitation on the employer’s ability to fire the employee, is normally “at will.” Continue reading

Posted in "At-Will" Employment, Arbitrary Reason for Firing, DC Employment Agreements, Employment Contracts in DC, Employment Law Newsletters, Washington DC Employment Contracts | Comments Off on What Does It Mean to Be an “At Will” Employee?

Common-Sense Suggestions to the EEOC

The EEOC has extremely important tasks in receiving and handling charges of employment discrimination, harassment, or retaliation, but is following self-defeating procedures and failing to solve longstanding problems. Some common-sense changes would work far better for the Commission, the charging parties, and employers, and would make the Commission’s limited resources more productive. Here are my ideas. Continue reading

Posted in Conciliation, Discrimination in the Workplace, EEOC, Employment Law Newsletters, Sexual Harassment in the Workplace, Washington DC Harassment On the Job, Workplace Retaliation | Tagged | Comments Off on Common-Sense Suggestions to the EEOC