Category Archives: Baseless Cases for Washington DC Employment Law

What are baseless cases in DC employment law? Read our blog posts on how to prove discrimination or harassment in the workplace.

6 Legal Issues That Enable Serial Harassers

Published by Law360 on November 16, 2017; posted with permission under license. Richard Seymour The questions raised in the public mind by the allegations against Bill Cosby, Roger Ailes, Bill O’Reilly, Harvey Weinstein and other powerful accused sexual and racial harassers are important: If the allegations are true, how did they manage to get away with it for so long? Why didn’t the victims complain earlier? Where were human resources and company compliance officers? Parts of the answers to these questions are clear, and the evidence of the enablers is not pretty. There is a common theme in many of the accounts given by harassment victims: fear. Fear of retaliation, fear of having a career destroyed, fear of being unemployable if the victim has a public record of having filed a harassment lawsuit, the fear of public humiliation as the most intimate and painful details of their lives are laid…
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Posted in Arbitration, Baseless Cases for Washington DC Employment Law, Common Sense in DC Employment Law Cases, Harassment, Hostile Environment at Work, Mediation for Employment Disputes, Sexual Harassment in the Workplace, Unfair Treatment On the Job, Washington DC Harassment On the Job, Workplace Retaliation | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What is the Proper Role for Dispositive Motions in Arbitration?

To achieve speedy resolutions, and to resolve matters as cost-effectively as possible, arbitrators should be careful in allowing the filing of dispositive motions. They make sense for gateway issues, but not for issues going to the substance of the merits. Allowing such motions generally would lengthen the time required to resolve cases, and multiply discovery to the magnitude needed in Federal courts. When trials are held on affidavits, the parties need a lot of depositions because that may be their only opportunity to examine the other sides’ witnesses. Ruling out trials by affidavits in the bulk of cases allows the promise of arbitration–faster, cheaper and fair resolutions–to be realized. Parties need to know at the outset what will and will not be allowed, so they that can cut their discovery needs. Continue reading

Posted in ABA, ADR for DC Employment Law Cases, Baseless Cases for Washington DC Employment Law, Employment Law Newsletters, Federal Rules for Employment Law, Meritorious Cases for Employment Law, Summary Judgment in Employment Law Cases, Washington DC Arbitration | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

New Supervisors: Common-Sense Pointers for Employers and Employees

By Richard T. Seymour www.RickSeymourLaw.com Copyright © 2010, Richard T. Seymour Better Ways of Managing Employment Disputes: Training New Supervisors Most employment disputes involving claims of discrimination, retaliation, or harassment, never make it to court. Employees choose not to pursue some disputes that far, or both sides reach a resolution before the EEOC or a State or local agency. Of the cases that do make it all the way into court, however, an astonishing number involve the actions of new supervisors. My personal perception is that employers, employees, and especially the new supervisors frequently mishandle the kinds of problems that predictably arise when a new supervisor is assigned. The result is a discrimination or retaliation complaint or lawsuit that could have been avoided. Why Are New Supervisors Assigned? There are three principal situations when a new supervisor is assigned, and the problems differ based on the situation. First, a new…
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Posted in Baseless Cases for Washington DC Employment Law, Discrimination in the Workplace, Federal Rules for Employment Law, Hostile Environment at Work, Meritorious Cases for Employment Law, Summary Judgment in Employment Law Cases, Washington DC Age Discrimination in Employment, Washington DC Arbitration, Washington DC Harassment On the Job, Workplace Retaliation | Leave a comment