Newsletters

One Defendant Compels Arbitration, Others “Wait and See”

When a plaintiff sues a company or agency and its officials, and only the company or agency compels arbitration, does the arbitration-losing plaintiff get a “second bite at the apple” in the lawsuit, against the officials? Or do the officials get a low-risk chance to get out of the lawsuit without ever getting to the merits? And what happens if plaintiff wins the arbitration? Read the blog post for the answers. Continue reading

What is the Proper Role for Dispositive Motions in Arbitration?

To achieve speedy resolutions, and to resolve matters as cost-effectively as possible, arbitrators should be careful in allowing the filing of dispositive motions. They make sense for gateway issues, but not for issues going to the substance of the merits. Allowing such motions generally would lengthen the time required to resolve cases, and multiply discovery to the magnitude needed in Federal courts. When trials are held on affidavits, the parties need a lot of depositions because that may be their only opportunity to examine the other sides’ witnesses. Ruling out trials by affidavits in the bulk of cases allows the promise of arbitration–faster, cheaper and fair resolutions–to be realized. Parties need to know at the outset what will and will not be allowed, so they that can cut their discovery needs. Continue reading

Common-Sense Suggestions to the EEOC

The EEOC has extremely important tasks in receiving and handling charges of employment discrimination, harassment, or retaliation, but is following self-defeating procedures and failing to solve longstanding problems. Some common-sense changes would work far better for the Commission, the charging parties, and employers, and would make the Commission’s limited resources more productive. Here are my ideas. Continue reading

Richard Seymour Spoke On Evidence In Employment Cases As Part Of An Ali-aba Conference

Richard Seymour spoke on December 5, 2008, on Evidence in employment cases, at an ALI-ABA conference in Washington, D.C., sponsored by the American Law Institute and American Bar Association.